The Roosevelts, A Strong and Active Faith (1944-1962) : An Intimate History.
(eVideo)

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[San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2015.
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1 online resource (1 videos file, approximately 120 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound
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English

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Title from title frames.
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Originally produced by PBS in 2014.
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By April of 1944, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt have occupied the White House for more than eleven years. The President is secretly convalescing in South Carolina from a recently diagnosed bout of congestive heart failure while the war rages overseas and his family is under press scrutiny at home. Despite his failing health, FDR has ambitious postwar plans for his country: to see the horrific struggle through to victory, and then to bring the United States into a new international organization strong enough to insure that the world will not go to war again – the United Nations. He calls for a new "Economic Bill of Rights," and with unanimous Congressional support signs the GI Bill of Rights, providing returning veterans with opportunities for education, housing and business. Eleanor Roosevelt is pleased with her husband's renewed call for reform and is determined he does not abandon the causes so important to them both. But FDR seeks to escape from the pressures of the presidency and craves the comfort and companionship of women like his cousin Daisy, his daughter Anna, and increasingly, his old love Lucy Mercer Rutherford. When the Allies storm the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, FDR reassures the public on the radio with his "D-Day Prayer." The oldest man in the invasion force is fifty-seven-year-old General Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. He successfully leads his men up the beachhead, but then a month later he dies of a massive heart attack. And while Franklin Roosevelt's physician assures the press and the American people that the President's health is "excellent in all respects," fewer and fewer Democratic insiders believe this to be true – although they also know it is no time to change leadership. FDR accepts his party's nomination and their choice of Harry Truman as his running mate, and despite his poor health, launches a rigorous and successful campaign against Thomas Dewey. As election day draws near, news of victory is reported from battlefields around the world, and the President wins the election by the slimmest of margins. In February 1945, President Roosevelt makes the arduous journey of fourteen thousand miles to Yalta to meet again with Churchill and Stalin. The Americans and British are deeply concerned with Stalin's demands to retain the Eastern European territories his troops occupy, but they lack the leverage to negotiate. The President returns from Yalta weary and ill, so weary that he sits to deliver his report to Congress, and for the first time in public he makes reference to the braces without which he could not stand. On March 30, 1945 Franklin Roosevelt travels to Warm Springs to relax and, as he told Daisy, "sleep and sleep and sleep." But on Friday afternoon, April 12, the President suffers a massive cerebral hemorrhage and dies. Eleanor accompanies her husband's body to Washington, DC, and then to Hyde Park where he is buried in his mother's rose garden. For many it is inconceivable that anyone but Franklin Roosevelt could be President of the United States. And although Theodore Roosevelt's shadow has always loomed large over Franklin Roosevelt, in the end FDR accomplishes much more in his twelve years as president than Theodore Roosevelt was ever able to realize. After FDR dies, Eleanor Roosevelt never slows down or loses sight of the goals for which she and her husband fought so hard for so long. When President Harry Truman asks her to be a delegate to the United Nations, she agrees – and proceeds to impress skeptical fellow-delegates with her courage and tenacity in the face of Soviet opposition to her plan for Eastern European refugees. She is later chosen to head the committee charged with drawing up a Universal Declaration of Human Rights and through tact and tough negotiation – what one admirer calls her distinctive blend of "naiveté" and "cunning" – the Declaration is adopted without a single dissenting vote. Eleanor Roosevelt travels extensively in her later years – to India, Israel, the Soviet Union – many times in the company of a new friend, a physician eighteen years younger than she, Dr. David Gurewitsch. As she has with other close friends over the years, Eleanor Roosevelt comes to rely on and love David Gurewitsch. When David marries Edna Perkel, the three eventually purchase a house and share a deep friendship that will last for the rest of ER's life. Eleanor Roosevelt also spends her last years involved in championing civil rights and women's rights, disagreeing with religious and political leaders, supporting presidential candidates, knowing it is imperative that the Democrats return to power. But by the early 1960s, ER begins to slow down. During the summer of 1962, she takes one more trip to her beloved Campobello. Upon her return to New York, her health grows steadily worse and she dies at home on November 7, 1962. Like her uncle and her husband before her, Eleanor Roosevelt weathered adversity and personal pain to become a strong, independent person. It is the legacy of all three Roosevelts that they emerged stronger from the trials they suffered and exemplified Ernest Hemingway's words: "Everyone is broken by life, but afterward many are strong in the broken places."
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Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Burns, K. (2015). The Roosevelts, A Strong and Active Faith (1944-1962): An Intimate History . Kanopy Streaming.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Burns, Ken, 1953-. 2015. The Roosevelts, A Strong and Active Faith (1944-1962): An Intimate History. Kanopy Streaming.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Burns, Ken, 1953-. The Roosevelts, A Strong and Active Faith (1944-1962): An Intimate History Kanopy Streaming, 2015.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Burns, Ken. The Roosevelts, A Strong and Active Faith (1944-1962): An Intimate History Kanopy Streaming, 2015.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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Grouped Work IDd6ab0ee9-85e8-8bbe-4b47-9e29bedb73b8-eng
Full titleroosevelts a strong and active faith 1944 1962 an intimate history
Authorkanopy
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Last Update2023-10-04 17:05:13PM
Last Indexed2024-04-13 02:42:32AM

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But FDR seeks to escape from the pressures of the presidency and craves the comfort and companionship of women like his cousin Daisy, his daughter Anna, and increasingly, his old love Lucy Mercer Rutherford. When the Allies storm the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, FDR reassures the public on the radio with his "D-Day Prayer." The oldest man in the invasion force is fifty-seven-year-old General Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. He successfully leads his men up the beachhead, but then a month later he dies of a massive heart attack. And while Franklin Roosevelt's physician assures the press and the American people that the President's health is "excellent in all respects," fewer and fewer Democratic insiders believe this to be true – although they also know it is no time to change leadership. FDR accepts his party's nomination and their choice of Harry Truman as his running mate, and despite his poor health, launches a rigorous and successful campaign against Thomas Dewey. As election day draws near, news of victory is reported from battlefields around the world, and the President wins the election by the slimmest of margins. In February 1945, President Roosevelt makes the arduous journey of fourteen thousand miles to Yalta to meet again with Churchill and Stalin. The Americans and British are deeply concerned with Stalin's demands to retain the Eastern European territories his troops occupy, but they lack the leverage to negotiate. The President returns from Yalta weary and ill, so weary that he sits to deliver his report to Congress, and for the first time in public he makes reference to the braces without which he could not stand. On March 30, 1945 Franklin Roosevelt travels to Warm Springs to relax and, as he told Daisy, "sleep and sleep and sleep." But on Friday afternoon, April 12, the President suffers a massive cerebral hemorrhage and dies. Eleanor accompanies her husband's body to Washington, DC, and then to Hyde Park where he is buried in his mother's rose garden. For many it is inconceivable that anyone but Franklin Roosevelt could be President of the United States. And although Theodore Roosevelt's shadow has always loomed large over Franklin Roosevelt, in the end FDR accomplishes much more in his twelve years as president than Theodore Roosevelt was ever able to realize. After FDR dies, Eleanor Roosevelt never slows down or loses sight of the goals for which she and her husband fought so hard for so long. When President Harry Truman asks her to be a delegate to the United Nations, she agrees – and proceeds to impress skeptical fellow-delegates with her courage and tenacity in the face of Soviet opposition to her plan for Eastern European refugees. She is later chosen to head the committee charged with drawing up a Universal Declaration of Human Rights and through tact and tough negotiation – what one admirer calls her distinctive blend of "naiveté" and "cunning" – the Declaration is adopted without a single dissenting vote. Eleanor Roosevelt travels extensively in her later years – to India, Israel, the Soviet Union – many times in the company of a new friend, a physician eighteen years younger than she, Dr. David Gurewitsch. As she has with other close friends over the years, Eleanor Roosevelt comes to rely on and love David Gurewitsch. When David marries Edna Perkel, the three eventually purchase a house and share a deep friendship that will last for the rest of ER's life. Eleanor Roosevelt also spends her last years involved in championing civil rights and women's rights, disagreeing with religious and political leaders, supporting presidential candidates, knowing it is imperative that the Democrats return to power. But by the early 1960s, ER begins to slow down. During the summer of 1962, she takes one more trip to her beloved Campobello. Upon her return to New York, her health grows steadily worse and she dies at home on November 7, 1962. Like her uncle and her husband before her, Eleanor Roosevelt weathered adversity and personal pain to become a strong, independent person. It is the legacy of all three Roosevelts that they emerged stronger from the trials they suffered and exemplified Ernest Hemingway's words: "Everyone is broken by life, but afterward many are strong in the broken places."
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